Thursday, March 15, 2007

March 15th Garden, Parsnips & Garlic

Doesn't look much different than February 15th (see last summer links in that post too). It does look different than January 15th! I've turned over the 2 furthest beds, but we've not yet 'tilled the new beds to be or widened the herb bed yet. The mole has done a little turning in the herb bed, I see. The perennials tucked in the vegetable rows are sprouting and will need to find new homes around the yard this year. I set the bean climber up so I could see how it creates shadows at different times. It is sitting where the 2 new beds will be and where I'll probably plant the beans too.
What hardy and pretty plants these parsnips are (above)! I need advice from the parsnip masters, however. According to your growing advice, Mr. Clodhopper (see link here), I think mine have taken on a schedule of their own.

Planted in April 2006, they were slow to sprout (as warned) and, by summer, the zucchini and bush beans took off and the parsnips were left in their shadows. Winter came and the weather wimpy zucs & beans left for a Mexican vacation. Parsnips saw their chance and they are happily growing more every day now. Don't think the roots are of any size yet, as I pulled one crowding his neighbor. From this point, when do you think they'll reach harvest size? Fall 2007 or some time this summer? And the garlic starts, planted February 10, have mostly sprouted. Finally, this weekend, I can see 2 of the 3 elephant garlic cloves sprouting in a row by the board at the top of the photo. I think I've given the garlic too much of the row space and I do have other things I want to grow. Hopefully, though, the harvest will last for a while in storage.

Last Oct., I decided to plant a few garlic and onion starts. But, then the rains and frost and snow and rains kept me out of the garden. Finally, in February, feeling sorry for the sprouting garlic in the little bag, I planted every one of them that seemed alive. The six roughed up places in the photo above? Yes, the onions are now sprouting in their little bag! So, right time or not, out they went last weekend to some wider areas among the garlic plantings.

This is not unlike how I also ended up with a number of perennials stuck in the vegetable beds: (1) Have sweet little starts from someone/somewhere desperately needing contact with soil, (2) have nicely dug up vegetable beds just waiting for their spring plantings, (3) oh, let's just let the sweet little perennials hang out in the veg. beds and we'll move them "later," (4) enjoy the flowers in with the vegetables and call it all "planning" as they bring in the good bugs and confuse the bad bugs!

13 comments:

RUTH said...

Sounds like some "well planned" companion planting.

Libbys Blog said...

I popped my garlic in pots but really must move them to the beds and do something with the onions that are taking off!!

Sheila said...

How lovely to see new growth in the garden, after all the snow. I'm still waiting.

meresy_g said...

I am envious of your garden. It will be a little longer until I have that much growth. I thought about tilling this weekend, but we are now expecting snow. Yuck. Spring isn't quite as close as I thought.

Rurality said...

Wow that green green grass reminds me of just how much rain we've been missing here.

Yolanda Elizabet said...

I've planted garlic a few weeks ago and they look similar to yours.

It's nice to see that your garden is waking up and that you are able to enjoy a spot of gardening. And don't worry, in my vegetable garden I bung in flowers and stuff too and call it companion planting. ;-)

A wildlife gardener said...

Sounds very exciting!

Molly said...

much as I hate to be the bearer of bad news, parsnips are biennials and any day now they will stop putting energy into their roots and will send up a flower stalk. Time to plant a new row and try again this year.

Gotta Garden said...

Oh, well, I was going to say I had never grown parsnips and am eager to hear about yours...but I just read molly's comment...oh dear...do let us know about them? I'm wondering about the taste, especially. Surely, they will be more flavorful than the ones you buy!

Petunia's Gardener said...

Sounds like I have good company in this flower/vegetable combinations!

Molly, thanks for the straight answer (all those reviews were good practice, I'm sure)! Are the flowers pretty enough to let them go to it?

clodhopper said...

Hi PG....p'nips need such a long season it's better to get them in earlier...we put them in if Feb for an autumn harvest over here. They will not have liked being shaded out, especially by zuchini which is very greedy and sucks up lots of nutrients. Give them a bit of space and light and lots of time in a well manured soil and you should get a decent crop. If you do get anything off them this year it may be a bit on the tough & woody side and, as molly sais, they may go to flower now.
Sorry for being so slow responding.....don't seem to be enough hours in the day just now!

Petunia's Gardener said...

Thanks for the advice, Clodhopper! I may let some go and see how they'll flower out. I'll watch out that I don't end up with seeds everywhere though. Next year, I'll have some more room as we'll be adding 2 more beds this year. I may wait until the right time next year to get them started again and this time make sure their space is protected. Hope you can fit in a little spring gardening.

Chris said...

I was glad to learn that parsnips are supposed to take a long time, while we have most of our other seeds producing a little growth our parsnips seem to have vanished :-) Great blog!